Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Laparascopic surgery

Laparoscopic surgery, also called minimally invasive surgery (MIS), bandaid surgery, or keyhole surgery, is a modern surgical technique in which operations in the abdomen are performed through small incisions (usually 0.5–1.5 cm) as opposed to the larger incisions needed in laparotomy. - Wikipedia

I am scheduled to go for a laparascopic surgery early next week. I have read a lot about it. But I can't depend on those information because knowing me, I am always the odd one out. I remember when I went for HSG, having read all the information I possibly could, I was calm. BUT read this and you will know what my experience was. I learnt my lesson from then on, that I gotta sometimes expect the worse. So at least I am mentally prepared.


If all goes well and I don't develop a fever (which means I have caught an infection) and my vomiting stops (if at all any - due to the anesthesia), I will be discharged the next day. I have no idea on how many days of hospitalization leave will be given as only once the doc performs the surgery, we will know how bad it is in there.


I for one, have never been admitted, ever. So that itself is creating an anxiety. Thank God hubby has said that he will stay with me. I cannot imagine going through this on my own.


Here's what generally happens:

Since my surgery is in the evening, I have been advised to get myself admitted early morning. They will prep me, which includes shaving. I went and waxed my lower abdomen and since I was at it, I did my Brazilian too! Some blood test will be done as well. Then of course once given the anesthesia and I'm in the OT, they will do 1 keyhole incision first, fill my abdomen up with carbon dioxide (so it'll be like a balloon), then do another keyhole incision and a third and forth if need be. They will insert a camera and on a screen they will inspect my uterus, tubes and ovaries. Also, my doc has mentioned he will shoot a dye in to see if I do indeed have left tubal hydrosalpinx. If it's bad, he will remove the tube. I am hoping that my right tube has not been affected.
The surgery can last as short as 30 minutes to as long as two hours.

Well, that is what generally happens. I will write about my actual experience when I am over and done with it! Laparascopic surgery part two shall follow soon!

Both photos courtesy of Google Image search
 

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